Wednesday, 1 August 2018

Hollywood news :: AWWW: Is this why Beyonce looks at Lebron James in some kind of way?

AWWW: Is this why Beyonce looks at Lebron James in some kind of way?

dailyadvent.com
Jul 31, 2018 11:25 AM
LeBron James and his foundation ‘LeBron James Family Foundation‘ on Sunday, in collaboration with the Akron (Ohio) Public Schools, launched a new elementary school for at-risk children in his hometown. The school called the I Promise School was created to be a place where at-risk students can attend school and be given an opportunity to thrive despite difficult family and life situations.
The idea of the school is modeled around LeBron’s early childhood where he missed much of the fourth grade because of his living conditions.
In a snippet of a video posted on the uninterrupted Instagram page, LeBron said: ‘I know these kids… Basically more than they know themselves, I’ve walked those streets, I rode the same bikes they ride on… I went through the same emotions – the good, the bad, the adversity…. Everything that these kids are going through – the drugs the violence, the guns everything that they are going through as kids I know’.
Another video shows the basketball champion telling why he built the school. “I know exactly what these 240 kids are going through… I’ve been there. They’re the reason why this school is here today,” he says.
It has been reported that the ‘I Promise School‘ will begin with two grades – third and fourth – with plans to expand in the coming years.
The school has a longer school day and longer school year with more than 40 staff members to accelerate the development of children who qualify for the program based on performance and socioeconomic factors.
ESPN further reports that for those who complete the program, James has arranged for free tuition to the University of Akron starting in 2021. He has also created a program for parents of the at-risk children to return to complete their high school education.
James was born on December 30, 1984, in Akron, Ohio to a 16-year-old mother, Gloria Marie James. His father, Anthony McClelland, was reportedly Gloria’s casual boyfriend with an extensive criminal record. Gloria raised James on her own. When James was growing up, life was often a struggle for the family, as they moved from apartment to apartment in the seedier neighborhoods of Akron while Gloria struggled to find steady work. Realizing that her son would be better off in a more stable family environment, Gloria allowed him to move in with the family of Frank Walker, a local youth football coach, who introduced James to basketball when he was nine years old.
James did not start playing organized basketball until he was in the fifth grade. He later played Amateur Athletic Union(AAU) basketball for the Northeast Ohio Shooting Stars. The team enjoyed success on a local and national level, led by James and his friends Sian Cotton, Dru Joyce III, and Willie McGee. The players were inseparable and dubbed themselves the “Fab Four”, promising each other that they would attend high school together. In a move that stirred local controversy, they chose to attend St. Vincent–St. Mary High School, a predominantly white private Catholic school.
James is an active supporter of non-profit organizations, including After-School All-Stars, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Children’s Defense Fund, and ONEXONE. He also has his own charity foundation, the LeBron James Family Foundation, which is based in Akron. Since 2005, the foundation has held an annual bike-a-thon to raise money for various causes. In 2015, James announced a partnership with the University of Akron to provide scholarships for as many as 2,300 children beginning in 2021. In 2016, he donated $2.5 million to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture to support an exhibit on Muhammad Ali. In 2017, he received the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award from the NBA for his “outstanding service and dedication to the community”. In November of that same year, the Akron School Board approved the “I Promise” Elementary School, a public school created in a partnership with the LeBron James Family Foundation to help struggling elementary school students stay in school. James later reflected that it was his most important professional accomplishment of his life.
Throughout his career, James has taken stances on controversial issues. On several occasions, he mentioned a feeling of obligation to effect change using his status. Those include the War in Darfur,  the Trayvon Martin case, the now-former NBA owner Donald Sterling’s racist comments in 2014, the Michael Brown verdict, and the death of Eric Garner. Following a racist incident at his Los Angeles home in 2017, James stated, “being black in America is tough. We got a long way to go for us as a society and for us as African Americans until we feel equal in America.” Later on that same year, in the aftermath of the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, James questioned President Donald Trump’s Make America Great Again slogan by stating “It’s sad what’s going on in Charlottesville. Is this the direction our country is heading? Make America Great Again huh? He said that” and “Our youth deserve better!!” James also called Trump a “bum” after the president rescinded a White House invitation to Steph Curry. On the other end of the spectrum, on February 16, 2018, Fox News journalist Laura Ingraham told James to “Shut up and dribble” as a response to his political agendas.
In June 2008, James donated $20,000 to a committee to elect Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama. Later that year, James gathered almost 20,000 people at the Quicken Loans Arena for a viewing of Obama’s 30-minute American Stories, American Solutions television advertisement. The advertisement was shown on a large screen above the stage, where Jay-Z later held a free concert. In November 2016, James endorsed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.


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